About your Search

20100107
20100107
STATION
CNBC 3
CSPAN 3
CNN 2
CSPAN2 2
WJLA (ABC) 2
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the doctor. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. for my arthritis, i use new capzasin quick relief gel. (announcer) starts working on contact and at the nerve level. to block pain for hours. new capzasin, takes the pain out of arthritis. >> larry: lawrence silver, the attorney for samantha geimer and debra tate. we're joined by robin sachs. author of "it happens every day inside the world of a sex crimes d.a." and the famed defense attorney mrk mark geragos. what do you want to have happen here? >> i think as a prosecutor, i want to see that this case get resolved and get resolved once and for all. and at this point, it's not about looking what does this say to other rapists who rape young girls? >> they are better off in the '70s than th
more coming up. a. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. #ñ#ñ#ñ#ñññññññññññññ >>> we're going to keep covering the mid-term elections because i'm looking for supply side cuts. it's vital to america's comeback. s. plus you'll get advanced, customizable trading platforms. and you get the kind of execution you'd expect from fidelity... ...with a dedicated specialist to talk about even your most complex trades.
talk a little bit about energy but not much about copenhagen again or climate change and the development agenda with regard to adaptation and mitigation. >> thank you, hattie. has you know, we are very committed to a program of supporting adaptation and mitigation and technology transfer in the developing world. i went to copenhagen and announced that the united states would commit to do our part of $100 billion by 2020. we worked very hard to get the building blocks of an agreement that would enable us to do so. the accord that we finally hammered out did have requirements for verification and transparency which have to be adhered to in order for us to be able and, frankly, willing to make these investments. but i think that for many of the developing countries, this is a lifeline that they are desperate to have and that they will work with us as we try to sort out how best to deliver on that commitment. this is going to be an ongoing challenge and that is why i mention we have to do a better job of getting some of the other countries that have a role to play more co
. we will work around his schedule. we've talked to the people in copenhagen, a great author on the entire subject. he'd say he'd be here anytime mr. gore would be here. i think it's time he kind of came out of the closet and sat down and debated this thing. >> as i'm looking at this, buddy, how is this smoke coming out? >> it's -- >> what are you doing? >> it's sitting on a ford f-350 pickup and adapted the tail pipe to come up and bored a hole in the back of the statue and running the exhaust out of the mouth as we play his copenhagen speech. we're trying to do it, use some humor, get the word out, get people involved and curious about this stuff and we have it on our frozen gore.com site. we also have a lot of literature and information. there's some brilliant articles there, the professor from the international arctic research center in fairbanks, alaska. he sees it a little different than mr. gore. he's lived it, breathed it. it was 64 below last winter. we had how many days, 87 days in a row it didn't get above 20 in fairbanks, 20 degrees. a buddy of mine and i decided
to have something new. >> later on "oprah," copenhagen. au pair is on location around the world to see how the rest of the world lives. >>> starbucks cuts calories on its menu. >> linda bell joins us live from new york with more. good morning. >> starbucks is looking to gain customers hoping to lose weight. they are adding sandwiches and some reduced calorie lattes. the new sandwiches will be less than 400 calories. this all starts next week as they look to continue recent profit growth. tough times for "the washington times." the paper is giving up its lavish headquarters on new york avenue and looking for somewhere else in the d.c. area. the job cuts last month went way deeper than first reported. all of this as the unification church founder to struggle for editorial control of the paper. stock index futures are pointing to a lower open this morning. we're keeping a close eye on the retail industry. december retail sales will come out today. shopper traffic reports a huge surge in bargain shopping after christmas. that is your business news. live at bloomberg headquarters in new york, i
on "oprah," how about real, dubai, copenhagen? oprah is on location around the world. >> we are not volunteer arlington. to volunteer to they come up go to wjla.com, keyword "volunteer." >> good morning, waington. >>> bristol palin joins the business world. >> and the bush family apparently needs more space. philip stewart is that the live desk this morning. good morning. >> former president george bush with wife borat needs more space. they have the house next door knocked down. they bought the second house last year for about half a million dollars. there was speculation secret service agents with stay there. but they just wanted more space on their property. bristol palin is going public, public relations, that is. she is setting up her own puic-relations firm in anchorage. she of course has made lots of headlines after she gave birth to a son in december of 2008. ta a look at this. in mcdonald's customers in kansas city was unhappy with her hamburger. she took out her rage on the employee. she was not -- she did not get a refund. she threw a bucket of water including a b
. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. >>> sometimes, you know, when there is a big announcement, it's what happens behind the scenes that keeps you fixated. >> chris dodd announced yesterday that he was not going to seek re-election. >> reporter: sure you can tell everybody where to stand, but getting kids to stand still? good luck. we were more interested in what chris dodd's daughter was whispering. then we were in his speech, 4-year-old christine had her hand on dad's shoulder, and then mom's nose. and then the older daughter goi going gaga at the mention of her name, and then she washes off his kiss. but beware what they eat, the man voters pick to be new jersey's next governor was not the only thing picked at his speech. we have
was wondering if i could say hi to the doctor. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. oh, that's kyle. he aced his fifth grade geography class. you see, now that we're using fedex to ship globally,
in town for a few days, and i was wondering if i could say hi to the doctor. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. >>> gm is opening a new lithium-ion battery plant this morning with chairman and ceo ed whitaker in attendance. phil lebeau is there and he joins us now with what to expect. good morning, phil. >> reporter: good morning, becky. this is the star attraction, aside from ed whitaker talking with us today. this is the battery pack, the lithium-ion battery pack, going inside the volt and other electric vehicles that general motors plans to be making from here on forward. production actually starts today. this is a big deal for general motors because they have sunk a lot of their future bets into this plant being a success. again,
is the security of the citizens. >> thank you mr. speaker. given the disappointing finish to the copenhagen conference what action can my honorable friend tell us he will be taking in order to keep the momentum up on this absolutely vital task of climate change? >> mr. speaker, for the first time the world was able to agree that we should not have a climate change policy that did not address the problems of rising temperatures and the 2% limit was agreed by all countries. we also have agreement countries will notify what they will do by 2020 and they've got to do so by january 31st. we are obviously pressing countries to be in the position they can reduce the amount of gigatons in carbon and greenhouse gas emissions from the mid 50's in 2020 to the mid 40's and there has been a great transparency achieved with every country agreeing to report what they are doing that we have not yet got the international duty that we need and we haven't yet got the announcement from all countries they support the 50% reduction by 2015. that is what is still to be done and i agree we must not talk to all tho
of london or manchester, or copenhagen or paris. and so it's very hard than with the multiple theaters at play when we're talking about the terrorism threat of the 21st century, to say we're in one paradigm or the other. and i think one of the things we have failed collectively as an american society to do is to decide how we're going to deal with this threat. and to deal with it in a way that, not only appears legitimate perhaps to the international committee, but is it constitutionally legitimate. much of the debate in a prior administration surrounded the military commissions act and the military commissions, but i think the larger question of how to deal with known terrorist actors who are trained, connected to this international network, but against whom we may not have sufficient evidence to present in a criminal context or even a military commission context, what do you do about those threats. remained initiative and useful yesterday in the president's address where the president said, that with respect to the many detainees and ensemble, given the conditions on the ground in ye
on copenhagen, didn't really get a consensus going except yeah, we're going to have another meeting in a while. but you say enough of that poppy cock. it's time to move to plan b. what is plan b in your estimation? what should we be doing? >> plan b is what mankind has always done throughout the ages what mankind does in different parts of the globe at the present time where the temperature is very different in countries, very cold countries and what people do is they adapt. mankind is superb and at adapting and we are better now because of modern technology adapt to go whatever nature and the climate throws at us than we've ever been before. so that is what we should do. that is what we will do. that is plan b. the idea that you can get a global agreement on decor car -- decarbonization is poppy cook. even if you did, it shows you're not going to. the meeting later this year is a complete waste of time. even if you did get an agreement, the cost to the economy will be far greater than any benefit you would conceivably get. >> so you suggest -- we just keep using fossil fuel, carbon based stuf
now. >> that's president obama at the copenhagen climate summit which ended with a non-binding agreement between nations. executive editor of "rolling stone" magazine who brings us the cover story "as is world burns," the author writes this -- despite the near certainty of a climate catastrophe, there are no crowds marching in the streets to demand action, no prime time speech from president obama. even the most aggressive climate legislation will still fall tragically short, but climate scientists tell us need to be done to avoid the looming chaos. in that sense the battle over global warming may already be over. your very provocative cover, "you idiots." who were you talking to? >> we were talking to 17 folks who we think are climate killers. people who have done the most or done the least -- >> you put warren buffett on that. >> warren buffett has not only trashed climate change legislation calling it a huge tax saying it will cause jobs, he's also been investing heavily in its failure. he bought $26 billion railroad, the biggest acquisition in his career, a railroad
're trying to come up with some follow-on actions to the copenhagen meeting. it was not obviously what people had hoped for, but it did give us a starting point to make the case that we have to make. and transferring and mitigating and technology are all part of that. . those amounts would swamp current development assistance. what's the prospect for making that assistance truly additional, so it doesn't rob peter to pay paul, and secondly, what are your plans for implementation within the u.s. government. would it be teleusaid, or separate? how would it be coordinated? >> some of it would be through usaid and the state department and some would be through contributions to multilateral institutions like the world bank. we are just beginning to work out how best to deliver thon commitment. it's a fair question, fred, how much of it is additive and how much of it is out of the current budget. we don't know that yet, because we don't know what the congress is going to do. we obviously believe that this is a critical point. we would hope that with the stimulus money, we will actually be competiti
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)